Halloween Week Day 5: Top 5 movie villains

Ever since I’ve been old enough to remember watching movies, I’ve loved the bad guys. I don’t really know why, but I find most villains charming and interesting, even though some of them truly are pure evil. So I decided to make a little top 5 of some of my favourite movie villains.

The Joker (The Dark Knight, 2008)

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It is without surprise that I start this list with the Joker (Heath Ledger) from The Dark Knight. Not only has the Joker been one of my favourite characters of all time ever since I was a little girl, Ledger’s performance is one of the best ones I have ever seen in my life. He is truly disturbing in this role and does a great job keeping us at the edge of our seat throughout the whole movie. The movie definitely wouldn’t have been the same with anyone else in this role.

Hannibal Lecter (The Silence of the Lambs, 1991)

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Another great performance, this time by Anthony Hopkins as Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs. Some people don’t consider him as the main villain of the movie, some don’t even consider him as a villain at all (which is a bit weird), but I think that ultimately, he is one of the greatest villains ever created. He might appear as a “secondary” villain in this movie, but I personally think that he actually is the main one, he’s just extremely good at hiding his real intentions.

Annie Wilkes (Misery, 1990)

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Probably one of the most hardcore fans to ever “live”, Annie Wilkes (Kathy Bates) terrified me so much as a kid, I kept having this dream where she’d break my ankles. I didn’t even want to write for a little while, just in case she’d burst through the door and try to strap me to the bed. Yeah, I guess she’s got that kind of effect on people. First introduced to us as a seemingly overly nice and caring nurse, It doesn’t take long for us to discover the true nature of Annie Wilkes and her obsession over Misery.

Alex DeLarge (A Clockwork Orange, 1971)

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Not exactly a villain per-say, Alex (Malcolm McDowell) is more often perceived as a anti-hero. But he does do terrible things; from rape to murder, from harassing to beating up people for no reason, Alex is a troubled young man going through life by being as violent as possible. With his distinct look and attitude, Alex is quite a dangerous person, who doesn’t really care about anything and will stop at nothing to show the all the power violence makes him feel.

Patrick Bateman (American Psycho, 2000)

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Kind of like Alex DeLarge, Patrick Bateman (Christian Bale) is often seen as a anti-hero more than like an actual villain, in parts because of the ambiguous ending of the film. But no matter how you interpret the ending, I believe that Patrick Bateman is one of the most enjoyable villains to watch evolve during a movie. I also think he is a very interesting character; the way he describes every little thing throughout the movie really gets us into his head and allows us to understand how he thinks.

Honorable mentions

  1. Bellatrix Lestrange (the Harry Potter series, 2001-2011)
  2. Pennywise the Dancing Clown aka It (It, 1990)
  3. Norman Bates (Psycho, 1960)
  4. Scar (The Lion King, 1994)

Halloween Week Day 2 – Part 2: “Psycho” (1960) vs. “Psycho” (1998)

The original Psycho movie, directed by Alfred Hitchcock in 1960, is one of the greatest movies ever made; it is a classic. Its 1998 remake, not so much. Directed by Gus Van Sant, the remake doesn’t stand a chance against its predecessor, and even if you don’t take the original one in consideration, 98’s Psycho isn’t that good.

Psycho (1960)

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This movie is a masterpiece. Suspenseful, beautifully shot and offering us one of the most iconic movie villains ever created, Psycho is definitely an important movie, not only for Hitchcock’s career, but for the entire History of cinema. We are first introduced to Marion Crane (Janet Leigh), thinking we are meeting our main character, only to later be outplayed by the film itself; something not many movies succeed to do. For most of its running time, the movie seems to be going in a certain direction, but in the end, we realize how foolish we were not to concentrate on the other part of the story. I also have to mention the use of the black and white colouring, which is amazing. It allows the movie’s Film Noir vibes to stand out distinctively. As for the acting, it is great, especially Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates, who really does make us feel uncomfortable, even though we also kinda pity him. He brings a certain boyish charm to an otherwise uncanny character.

Psycho (1960): A

Psycho (1998)

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Not only are most of the actors’ performances in the remake superbly inferior, the characters also have a lot less depth and complexity. The remake doesn’t bring anything new to the story; most of it remains unchanged, and the few changes that are made are definitely not in the favour of the film. Most of the movie is a poorly executed shot by shot, line by line remake. The original movie makes great use of suspense and the character of Norman Bates is really intriguing. The remake though, lets us know way too early how deranged Norman really is, taking away a lot of the suspense of the story. Plus, Vince Vaughn’s portrayal of Norman Bates is incredibly off and we absolutely cannot take this character as seriously as we should in this version. It is almost as if the movie either doesn’t even try to be good, or tries a bit too much and fails impressively.

Psycho (1998): D

 

In conclusion, should you watch the remake? Not really. It’s not even a “so bad, it’s good” kind of movie, it’s just plain bad. You should definitely check out the original one thought, I promise you will not regret it.